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Honey Walnut Breakfast Loaf

This honey walnut breakfast loaf is one of our favorites during the fall. We use black walnuts because you can harvest them wild here in appalachia but any kind of walnut works just fine. The bread is dense and thick, perfect for hearty meals for fall. This fall recipe is sure to please at the breakfast table. #Breakfast #BreakfastLoaf #BreakfastBread #BreakfastRecipes #BreadRecipes #FallRecipes #HoneyRecipes #WalnutBread #WalnutLoaf

My favorite thing about fall isn’t sweaters, boots, or pumpkin spice lattes, it’s baking. I bake all year round but it’s more acceptable in the fall when the weather is cooling down and the warmth from the oven is more welcomed. This time of year I’m always baking cookies, cakes, and pies as I try to figure out what I’ll be bringing to the holiday parties that are sure to be starting soon. The other night my husband mentioned wanting to try baking mini-pies in cupcake pans so that’ll be on the horizon soon. First though, I dug out my breakfast loaf pans because I wanted to make a favorite honey walnut breakfast loaf.

I use black walnuts for the bread because they are actually native to the appalachian region. You can find black walnut trees growing wild if you know where to look or you can find local farms that allow you to harvest your own. If you’re harvesting your own, you have to be careful because as the nuts ripen they fill with a dark black liquid that stains everything. I highly recommend using gloves because if you get the black walnut liquid on your hands it’s going to stain your skin for days. It’s a mess. If you’re into hand lettering or calligraphy, you may want to try harvesting the liquid because once upon a time it was actually used as ink. I know that’s off-topic but, you know, #funfact. I typically just go to the farmer’s market and buy black walnuts the farmer’s have already harvested. It’s just easier. If you don’t have or can’t find black walnuts, regular walnuts work just fine. 

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This honey walnut breakfast loaf is one of our favorites during the fall. We use black walnuts because you can harvest them wild here in appalachia but any kind of walnut works just fine. The bread is dense and thick, perfect for hearty meals for fall. This fall recipe is sure to please at the breakfast table. #Breakfast #BreakfastLoaf #BreakfastBread #BreakfastRecipes #BreadRecipes #FallRecipes #HoneyRecipes #WalnutBread #WalnutLoaf

My bread turned out soft and crumbly, just the way we like it. It’s very important, when combining the wet and dry ingredients, to work them only until just combined. If you over-work the bread dough, it’ll turn out dense and heavy which is not what you want in a breakfast loaf. You have to work the dough with a light hand and stop mixing when the dry ingredients are absorbed. 

This bread can be finicky so it’s important that you follow the directions exactly as described in the recipe below. It’s an easy recipe to follow but there’s not a lot of room for experimentation unless you’re familiar with baking bread.

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This honey walnut breakfast loaf is one of our favorites during the fall. We use black walnuts because you can harvest them wild here in appalachia but any kind of walnut works just fine. The bread is dense and thick, perfect for hearty meals for fall. This fall recipe is sure to please at the breakfast table. #Breakfast #BreakfastLoaf #BreakfastBread #BreakfastRecipes #BreadRecipes #FallRecipes #HoneyRecipes #WalnutBread #WalnutLoaf

To make this honey walnut breakfast loaf you’ll need:

Honey Walnut Breakfast Loaf
A delicious and hearty breakfast loaf sweetened with honey rather than sugar.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 2 tsp baking powder
  3. 1 tsp salt
  4. 1/2 tsp baking soda
  5. 1 large egg
  6. 1 cup milk
  7. 3/4 cup honey
  8. 2 tbsp butter, melted and brought to room temperature
  9. 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  10. 1 cup chopped black walnuts, divided
Instructions
  1. Preheat your oven to 350-degrees
  2. Grease a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with butter or cooking spray
  3. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, salt, and baking soda until well-blended.
  4. In a medium bowl, beat the large egg until no solid remains.
  5. Add milk, honey, butter, and vanilla extract to the medium bowl with the egg. Beat until well-blended.
  6. Slowly pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, beating until just combined.
  7. Gently fold 3/4 cup chopped walnuts into the dough.
  8. Add the dough into the greased loaf pan and top with the remaining 1/4 cup chopped walnuts. Gently press the walnuts into top of the bread dough.
  9. Bake for approximately 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle of the bread comes out clean.
  10. Allow to cool on a wire rack for 10 - 15 minutes before removing from pan.
Notes
  1. If your bread turns out dense you likely overworked the dough when combining the wet and dry ingredients.
  2. You may substitute pecans for walnuts if you don't have walnuts available.
Adapted from Grandma's Family Recipe
Adapted from Grandma's Family Recipe
Honey and Pine Co http://www.honeyandpine.co/

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Comments

    • Black walnuts have a stronger taste than regular (english) walnuts. It’s hard to describe but I guess you would call it an “earthier” taste or “nuttier.” They are delicious and good for you but they are harder to crack and the black liquid can stain everything so I usually buy them already harvested and opened. They are more expensive though. Either type of walnut works fine in this bread. I just like the strong black walnut flavor to contract the sweet honey.

  1. That’s so great that you can pick your own local black walnuts! I have a friend who makes fabric and dyes it with natural dyes. She has often mentioned black walnut. So cool to think both of you are using them for different artisanal items.

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